Journal:
Journal of Financial Therapy

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ISSN
1945-7774
Publisher
Kansas State University
Editor-in-Chief
Kristy L. Archuleta
Journal Volumes
Journal Volume
Journal of Financial Therapy Volume 7
Journal of Financial Therapy (7)
Journal Volume
Journal of Financial Therapy Volume 8
Journal of Financial Therapy (8)
Description
The Journal of Financial Therapy primarily publishes clinical, experimental, and survey research that examines the empirical link between personal financial knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors and personal and family well-being. The journal also accepts cross-sectional survey research, longitudinal and panel study research, case studies, financial therapy practice management tutorials, and literature reviews. Articles from financial therapists, both those working in academia and in practice, are welcomed.

Search Results

Now showing 1 - 10 of 15
  • Publication
    Promoting Savings at Tax Time through a Video-Based Solution-Focused Brief Coaching Intervention
    ( 2016) Palmer, Lance ; Pichot, Teri ; Kunovskaya, Irina
    Solution-focused brief coaching, based on solution-focused brief therapy, is a well-established practice model and is used widely to help individuals progress toward desired outcomes in a variety of settings. This papers presents the findings of a pilot study that examined the impact of a video-based solution-focused brief coaching intervention delivered in conjunction with income tax preparation services at a Volunteer Income Tax Assistance location (n = 212). Individuals receiving tax preparation assistance were randomly assigned to one of four treatment groups: 1) control group; 2) video-based solution-focused brief coaching; 3) discount card incentive; 4) both the video-based solution-focused brief coaching and the discount card incentive. Results of the study indicate that the video-based solution-focused brief coaching intervention increased both the frequency and amount of self-reported savings at tax time. Results also indicate that financial therapy based interventions may be scalable through the use of technology.
  • Publication
    Editorial, Volume 7, Issue 1
    ( 2016) Archuleta, Kristy L.
    The Journal of Financial Therapy would not exist without the time and efforts of our excellent reviewers. You may be asking, ΓÇ£what does a reviewer do?ΓÇ¥ JFT is a unique scholarly publication because papers require the rigor of academic standards, but also must be translatable to non-researchers. It is not uncommon for researchers and practitioners to fail to communicate effectively with one another because the two groups speak what seems like different languages. Therefore, it is the goal of JFT to publish quality scholarly research and to emphasize the practicality of the research.
  • Publication
    Financial Empowerment and Health Related Quality of Life in Family Scholar House Participants
    ( 2016) Franz, Chelsey
    Research demonstrates an association between poverty and health. Populations in poverty suffer from poor mental and physical health, and thus, poor health-related quality of life. Research also indicates people living in the lower socio-economic categories experience higher levels of stress that are associated with these health declines. Family Scholar House, a local community intervention designed to alleviate poverty and improve socio-economic status by providing college education and support to single parents, combats these health outcomes by addressing the five social determinants of health (economic stability, education, social and community context, health care, and neighborhood and built environment). Quantitative analysis indicates an improvement in mental health among Family Scholar House participants: 0-12 month participants reported significantly more mentally unhealthy days than a control group; however, this difference is no longer significant at the end of participantΓÇÖs time in the program. Qualitative analysis suggests this improvement may be due to stress reduction related to increased economic stability and financial security gained through an intentional implementation of a financial empowerment curriculum within the Family Scholar House program. Implementation of financial empowerment into community programs designed to alleviate poverty may improve mental health and thus health-related quality of life.
  • Publication
    Sources of Referral in Student Financial Counseling
    ( 2016) Choi, Shinae ; Bartholomae, Suzanne ; Gudmunson, Clinton G. ; Fox, Jonathan
    This study evaluates sources of referral to financial counseling and varied declines in financial stress across the financial counseling process. College students came to counseling most often through self-referral. Younger students and women were more likely to respond to institutional referrals. There were two clearly discernable periods of decline in financial stress, smaller interim declines occurring after requesting appointments and larger declines that occurred in counseling sessions. The interim declines, however, were only operative for those who were self- or institutionally-referred and not for those who entered on a social-referral. A possible explanation is that social-referrals have already had ΓÇ£someone to talk toΓÇ¥ whereas other referrals may only begin to feel a psychological burden lifted after making an appointment. Total declines in financial stress were mostly impervious to individual differences and sources of referral lending support to the notion that financial counseling itself contributed to aggregate declines in financial stress.
  • Publication
    What It's Worth: Strengthening the Financial Future of Families, Communities and the Nation
    ( 2016) Stueve, Cherie
    This book overviews the financial challenges of vulnerable Americans and creative programs that look beyond income as a metric of financial health is divided into four sections. The first section, ΓÇ£Where We Are,ΓÇ¥ describes the current financial statistics of households by demographic and economic era. The second (and largest) section, ΓÇ£Why Financial Well-Being Matters for All,ΓÇ¥ is broken into four topics: the economy, financial services system, and community; employment and business; health and social services; and education. Each illustrates the strong role financial well-being plays in other systems at the individual and community level.
  • Publication
    Practitioner Profile: An Interview with Syble Solomon
    ( 2016) Solomon, Syble
    Syble Solomon is a speaker on the psychology of money and the founder and president of LifeWise Strategies. She is best known for Money Habitudes® a deck of cards (and now an online version) that makes it easy to talk about money and discover what motivates our financial behaviors. Before becoming interested in why people manage money as they do, she had careers in early childhood special education, gerontology and executive coaching. Seemingly unrelated, they all provided experience training, developing educational material and empowering people at all socio-economic levels to work through challenging times and transitions. An excellent background for helping people work through money-related issues!
  • Publication
    Building Financial Peace: A Conflict Resolution Framework for Money Arguments
    ( 2016) Asebedo, Sarah D.
    This paper presents a well-known and highly utilized conflict resolution framework from the mediation profession and demonstrates how to apply this framework to money arguments. While conflict resolution skills have been identified as important to communication within the financial planning context, an integrated conflict resolution framework has yet to be recognized and understood within the financial planning literature. This paper aims to fill this gap. Ultimately, both mental health professionals and financial planners can benefit from an interdisciplinary approach to resolving money arguments by combining training in personal financial strategies and conflict resolution principles.
  • Publication
    Money and Emerging Adults: A Glimpse into the Lives of College CouplesΓÇÖ Financial Management Practices
    ( 2016) Rea, Jennifer K. ; Zuiker, Virginia S. ; Mendenhall, Tai J.
    Being in a romantic relationship is a transition that many college students enter while earning a college degree. Twenty-four students between the ages of 19 to 29 years old who self-identified as being in a committed relationship participated in this study. They completed an online survey that included both quantitative and qualitative (open-ended) questions pertaining to money management practices. Key findings suggest that participants believe in communicating about their individual and combined finances so as to prevent or solve financial challenges. They also discussed the importance of having similar perspectives about financial values within their relationship. Financial therapists, counselors, and educators working with the college student populations should be aware of the issues couples in committed relationships face, and should tailor their money management programming with this in mind.
  • Publication
    Consideration of Financial Satisfaction: What Consumers Know, Feel and Do from a Financial Perspective
    ( 2016) Woodyard, Ann Sanders ; Robb, Cliff A.
    Financial satisfaction has long been considered an important component to consumer life satisfaction and well-being. Using data from the 2012 National Financial Capability Study (NFCS), financial satisfaction is explored in the context of personal characteristics related to financial knowledge (both objective and subjective) as well as self-reported financial behaviors. Ordinary Least Squares Regression is applied to a predictive model of financial satisfaction, and results indicate that measures associated with what people do (behaviors related to recommended practice) and how they feel (subjective knowledge) may be more salient factors to consider with regard to satisfaction than measures related to what individuals know (objective knowledge). Implications are considered for consumers in light of a general policy approach promoting financial literacy and education as a means of improving financial outcomes and well-being.
  • Publication
    An Economic Model of Mortality Salience in Personal Financial Decision Making: Applications to Annuities, Life Insurance, Charitable Gifts, Estate Planning, Conspicuous Consumption, and Healthcare
    ( 2016) James, Russell N.
    The study of personal mortality salience and the denial of death have a long history in psychology leading to the modern field of Terror Management Theory. However, a simple consumer utility function predicts many of the outcomes identified in experimental research in this field. Further, this economic approach explains a range of otherwise unexpected financial decision-making behaviors in areas as diverse as annuities, life insurance, charitable gifts and bequests, intra-family gifts and bequests, conspicuous consumption, and healthcare. With its relevance to such a wide range of personal financial decisions, understanding the impact of mortality salience can be particularly useful to advisors in related fields.