Citation Statistics

Date
Authors
Adler, Robert
Ewing, John
Taylor, Peter
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Abstract
Description
This is a report about the use and misuse of citation data in the assessment of scientific research. The idea that research assessment must be done using ``simple and objective'' methods is increasingly prevalent today. The ``simple and objective'' methods are broadly interpreted as bibliometrics, that is, citation data and the statistics derived from them. There is a belief that citation statistics are inherently more accurate because they substitute simple numbers for complex judgments, and hence overcome the possible subjectivity of peer review. But this belief is unfounded.
Comment: This paper commented in: [arXiv:0910.3532], [arXiv:0910.3537], [arXiv:0910.3543], [arXiv:0910.3546]. Rejoinder in [arXiv:0910.3548]. Published in at http://dx.doi.org/10.1214/09-STS285 the Statistical Science (http://www.imstat.org/sts/) by the Institute of Mathematical Statistics (http://www.imstat.org)
Keywords
Statistics - Methodology, Computer Science - Digital Libraries, Physics - Physics and Society
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