Publication:
Host and viral features of human dengue cases shape the population of infected and infectious Aedes aegypti mosquitoes

dc.contributor.author Simmons, Cameron
dc.date.accessioned 2018-09-14T11:15:00Z
dc.date.available 2017-07-12T03:45:45Z
dc.date.available 2018-09-14T11:15:00Z
dc.date.issued 2013-05-28 en_US
dc.description.abstract Dengue is the most prevalent arboviral disease of humans. The host and virus variables associated with dengue virus (DENV) transmission from symptomatic dengue cases (n = 208) to Aedes aegypti mosquitoes during 407 independent exposure events was defined. The 50% mosquito infectious dose for each of DENV-1-4 ranged from 6.29 to 7.52 log10 RNA copies/mL of plasma. Increasing day of illness, declining viremia, and rising antibody titers were independently associated with reduced risk of DENV transmission. High early DENV plasma viremia levels in patients were a marker of the duration of human infectiousness, and blood meals containing high concentrations of DENV were positively associated with the prevalence of infectious mosquitoes 14 d after blood feeding. Ambulatory dengue cases had lower viremia levels compared with hospitalized dengue cases but nonetheless at levels predicted to be infectious to mosquitoes. These data define serotype-specific viremia levels that vaccines or drugs must inhibit to prevent DENV transmission.
dc.identifier.uri https://demo7.dspace.org/handle/123456789/150
dc.language English en_US
dc.title Host and viral features of human dengue cases shape the population of infected and infectious Aedes aegypti mosquitoes en_US
dc.type Journal Article
dspace.entity.type Publication
relation.isAuthorOfPublication b1b2c768-bda1-448a-a073-fc541e8b24d9
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