Publication:
Corticosteroids for Dengue - Why Don't They Work?

dc.contributor.author Simmons, Cameron
dc.date.accessioned 2018-09-14T11:15:06Z
dc.date.available 2017-07-12T03:36:54Z
dc.date.available 2013-10-31 en_US
dc.date.available 2013-10-31 en_US
dc.date.available 2013-10-31 en_US
dc.date.available 2013-10-31 en_US
dc.date.available 2013-10-31 en_US
dc.date.available 2013-10-31 en_US
dc.date.available 2013-10-31 en_US
dc.date.available 2013-10-31 en_US
dc.date.available 2018-09-14T11:15:06Z
dc.date.issued 2013-12-01 en_US
dc.description.abstract BACKGROUND: Dysregulated immune responses may contribute to the clinical complications that occur in some patients with dengue. FINDINGS: In Vietnamese pediatric dengue cases randomized to early prednisolone therapy, 81 gene-transcripts (0.2% of the 47,231 evaluated) were differentially abundant in whole-blood between high-dose (2 mg/kg) prednisolone and placebo-treated patients two days after commencing therapy. Prominent among the 81 transcripts were those associated with T and NK cell cytolytic functions. Additionally, prednisolone therapy was not associated with changes in plasma cytokine levels. CONCLUSION: The inability of prednisolone treatment to markedly attenuate the host immune response is instructive for planning future therapeutic strategies for dengue.
dc.identifier.uri https://demo7.dspace.org/handle/123456789/197
dc.language English en_US
dc.title Corticosteroids for Dengue - Why Don't They Work? en_US
dc.type Journal Article
dspace.entity.type Publication
relation.isAuthorOfPublication b1b2c768-bda1-448a-a073-fc541e8b24d9
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